AEE 671: How to Use “Lame” Like a Native Speaker + One Important Note on Political Correctness

how to use lame like a native English speaker

Do you ever hear native speakers using the word “lame” in English?

Do you know what it means and how to use it?

Find out in today’s episode!

Here is a sample conversation using “lame”:

L: Michelle last weekend I was so tired from work. All of my friends went out dancing and I stayed home and watched a Lifetime special and went to bed at 8.

M: Lindsay that’s lame. You should try to go out while you’re still young-ish

Today we have a good question from a listener:

“How is it going? I am Asmah from Indonesia. I am so happy that I can get your podcast, I have been listening to them for 6 month and that help  me a lot. I have couple questions. What is the meaning of LAME?, I watch a TV Show “How I Met Your Mother” and there is a sentence Barney is used to say “that’s lame” I am looking forward your answer in All Ears English podcast.”

Best Regard,

Asmah

 

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What is “lame”?

It’s an umbrella term.

It means weak, not enough, lazy, not alive, not vibrant, not right, not cool, not hip, not in style.

 

Things that are LAME:

  • Gift certificates can be lame if you buy them because you are too lazy to think about what the person might want.
  • For a teenager a curfew could be lame. You have to be home at 10 pm while all of your friends can be out until 1 am. That is lame.

 

What other things can be lame?

Leave us a comment below or ask a question!

Thanks for listening to today’s episode.

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