AEE Bonus: 3 Lazy Rules Every English Speaker Follows

lazy native English speakers

Today find out how to finally be able to understand natives when they speak fast by knowing what to listen for.

Plus, let’s check up on our app goals for the AEE community!

 

How are we doing on our BIG SHARE GOAL?

Special thank you to Joel Jonathan and Hanan from Saudi Arabia who shared the new AEE app in What’s App and Snap Chat.

How can you share the app? First of all you can download it here.

You can share this video: allearsenglish.com/appvideo

 

 

After you share the app video and this link please email lindsay@allearsenglish.com to tell us that you shared it and you’ll receive a personalized thank you email from Lindsay.

 

What about reviews and ratings?

Special thank you to everyone who wrote a review and left a rating this week.

Our goal: We want to get 1200 reviews by Feb 15th.

Can we reach our goal?

Let’s get there! Please go to the app store and leave us a rating and review now.

 

Exclusive limited- time bonus videos coming soon!

Jessica will take you to the soaking pool this week.

Lindsay filmed a video from her hometown of Keene, NH.

You can only get these special videos inside the iOS app.

 

How can you understand natives when they have lazy, natural speech?

You need to learn the rules of connected speech so that you know what to listen for when you are speaking to natives.

Here are the top three things to look for:

  • Natives change sounds: This is especially true with the “T” sound when it occurs in words like “Twitter” or ” butter” or “computer” or “better.” These words have a “D” sound not a “T” sound. This is often true with words where the T occurs in the middle of the word and between two vowels.

 

  • Combining words: Natives are lazy when they talk. Whatever is quickest to form in our mouths is the way we say it. Instead of saying, “what did you do last weekend” instead a native would say, “Whad-j-ya-do last weekend?”

 

  • Rule of insertion: We put the “Y” or “W” sound in between two vowel sounds. We do this between two words like “I agree” becomes “I-ya-agree”

 

When you’re ready to build the skills that you need to understand natives you can join our Bridge to Connection Method course.

We take you across the US and introduce you to native speakers all around the country.

Click here to get into the course now.

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