Lindsay McMahon
"The English Adventurer"
Michelle Kaplan
"The New York Radio Girl"

Have you been practicing your English phrasal verbs?

Have you tried using the ones we’ve gone over in the right situations?

Today we’re going to do a review of all the phrasal verbs that we have learned in this series.

This won’t be a boring or traditional review though—we’re going to make this fun and create an effective and unique way of remembering your phrasal verbs and when to use them.

Today it’s all about a fun trivia game, and you will come out of this an expert on phrasal verbs!

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A Different And Fun Approach To Remember

We’re doing something fun and a little different today, which will help you within this latest series.

Lindsay and Aubrey will take turns quizzing each other about the phrasal verbs we taught in this series, and you guys can play at home!

We’ll go in order, starting with the first episode in the series 1489 on travel phrasal verbs.

We taught six phrasal verbs in this episode, and I’m going to describe them and you have to guess the verb.

This is like $20,000 Pyramid–have you seen that game show?

It’s a great trivia based game show where you can progress if you know the answers.

That’s a great game show to watch for some helpful native English speaking, and it’s a fun way to do it.

This trivia game is a fun way to review, and it adds some fun to keep it interesting and to keep you motivated.

You want to follow along so that you can see how we’re doing this, and then you will want to try this at home on your own as well.

This is a true test if you have been practicing enough, or if you still need to work at this a bit more.

You can have fun playing these little games along with us, and it serves as a great review for learning your phrasal verbs that will come in handy.

Review of 1489–Phrasal Verbs About Travel

Here are a few examples from the first episode in this series that can help you to remember which phrasal verb to use at the right time.

-This is what you do with your luggage when you arrive at the airport—drop off!

-Yes! And this is what you do when you need to grab some food while traveling—pick up!

-Good! And this is what you do when you first arrive at a hotel—check in!

-And you do this when you have directions or flight details you need to remember—write it down!

-And this is what you do when it’s time to board the plane—get on!

-Right! And this is when the plane leaves—take off! You did great—see how much fun this can be!

Let’s get into the next part and see how Aubrey does at trying to guess them.

Review of 1492–Phrasal Verbs For Education

For the second part in the series, we taught phrasal verbs we use for education in episode 1492.

So Lindsay will describe them and Aubrey will guess.

Lindsay reads the clue, and Aubrey provides the answer.

-Ok, this is when you want to really research or study something thoroughly—read up on!

-Great! This is when you’re in a class and the teacher gives you something—hand out!

-And this is when you’re very interested in learning something—be into! This is a harder one worth practicing.

-This is when you want to start a new activity like a sport or hobby—take up!

-This means checking something careful—go over!

-And this is when you have to submit work you have done in a class—turn in or hand in!

-Checking something carefully could also be look over, check over, and look over.

There are so many phrasal verbs with similar meanings, so this can be a bit tricky.

There’s not just one answer, and it’s important to remember that.

Great job!

How are you guys doing at home?

Were you able to think of these right away?

If not, go back and review the episodes–and then practice using these verbs until they become second nature to you.

Review of Phrasal Verbs About Problems and Telephone Conversations

Okay, for the next two we’re going to switch it up for a different kind of trivia game where you have to fill in the blank.

Aubrey will give an example sentence that’s missing its phrasal verb and you tell us which one is missing.

The sentences come from the roleplays we did, so that might help you a bit!

First, we have the third part of the series, which was episode 1495 about problems.

Aubrey will read the sentence, and Lindsay will guess what to use to fill in the blanks.

1. I’ve ___________ a problem with a neighbor. RUN UP AGAINST or run into can work here too

2. I’m ___________whether I should talk to them about it. WRESTLING WITH or dealing with or struggling with can work here too

3. That would be frustrating, but I’m sure you’ll __________. FIGURE IT OUT or work it out is acceptable as well

4. I wonder if they’re just not ___________how it’s affecting their neighbors. THINKING THROUGH or thinking of is a good option

5. It’s definitely something you need to ________ if it’s keeping you awake! SORT OUT or deal with or figure out could work well too

There are so many similar meanings within this category, and you want to remember that.

As you can see with just these examples, there are multiple answers in most cases.

So though we focused on the specific phrasal verbs that we learned in each episode, there are often other options that work just as well.

Okay now Lindsay will read for the next one, which is episode 1498 about telephone conversations, and Aubrey will try to guess and fill in the blank.

1. I’m surprised you __________ the phone. Usually I get your voicemail! PICKED UP

2. ____________- my doctor is on the other line with results I’m expecting. HANG ON or hold on is another great option

3. I’m going through a tunnel so I’ll __________if we get ___________. CALL YOU BACK, if we get CUT OFF . Disconnected works but it’s more formal and not used as often with friends.

4. I can’t hear you. You’re ___________. BREAKING UP or fading out is another option

5. Sorry! Just __________if you can’t hear me and we can talk later. HANG UP

So you see that there are multiple phrases that can work in the same sort of way.

This is a great review, and it also shows you other options that can work just as well.

Review of Phrasal Verbs About Work and Money

Ok the last two we’re going to play like Taboo, where we have to describe the phrasal verb, but we have specific words we can’t say.

First, episode 1501 where we taught phrasal verbs about work.

Lindsay, you go first and let’s see how this goes.

Remember you are seeing the word that you are trying to guess, then the words you can’t use to describe it, and then the phrase that is being used to offer a clue.

(Slack off: the words that you can’t say are effort, energy)

-When someone is supposed to be completing a task and is doing a mediocre job.

(Run by: the words you can’t say are: idea, opinion)

-This is when you tell someone about maybe something you’re working on in order to get their take on it.

(Fill in for: the words you can’t say are: job, away)

-This is doing someone’s tasks when they’re on vacation.

(Take on: the words you can’t say are: responsibility, duties)

-When you accept additional tasks.

(Burn out: The words you can’t say are: tired, exhausted)

-When you work too hard and get mentally fatigued.

(Take over: The words you can’t say are: control, responsibility)

-If your parents own a restaurant, after they retire they hope you will do this.

Alright! Last one–we’re moving to episode 1505 about money.

Aubrey will describe the verbs for you, avoiding the taboo words she is not supposed to say.

(Save up: The words you can’t say are: spend, money)

-When you need to keep finances because something is coming up that will be expensive.

(Put aside: The words you can’t say are: money, regular)

-This is when you are keeping monthly funds for something specific. Set aside means the same thing here too.

(Rip off: The words you can’t say are: price, expensive)

-This is if you are paying money for something and you feel it is too much, or it’s overpriced in some way.

(Pay off: The words you can’t say are: payment, loans)

-This is if you went to a university that is expensive and you owe money, you would do this to lower the overall cost. Pay down is a subtle difference if you are trying to bring it down a bit.

(Pay back: The words you can’t say are: money, borrowed)

-When someone loans you some cash and you want to return it, you do this. Give back is a similar one here and would also work.

(Fork out / fork over: The words you can’t say are: spend, unwillingly)

-This is a large amount of money that you don’t necessarily want to pay. Cough up may work here, though it is less common.

Hopefully this has been a fun way of remembering which phrasal verbs to use when.

It’s good to have fun while learning something new, or trying to remember something that you have previously learned.

Takeaway

These quizzes likely gave you a very good idea of how well you know these phrasal verbs in a fun way!

If you’ve taken time to practice them and use them in conversation, you likely knew most of them and did very well.

If not, they were likely still very unfamiliar and that just means that you need a bit of practice with them.

Learning about them in this series is just the first step, and gets you headed in the right direction—but then you need to keep going.

You now need to practice using them so that next time you’re in any of these situations whether it’s traveling, taking a class, or even talking out a problem–you’ll be able to use them properly.

The more that you use these phrasal verbs, the more that they will come off in a native and natural way, thus taking your vocabulary to another level.

If you have any questions, please leave them below in the comments section.

We’ll get back to you as soon as we can.

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