AEE 613: The Meaning Behind “All Ears” and Why It Matters

all ears english expression

Today find out what the meaning is behind “All Ears” and why it matters!

We have a question from a listener:

“Hope you are doing great. Thanks a lot for answering my earlier questions in your episodes. Sorry for bothering you with my silly questions; but I wanted to know what do you mean by the title of your podcast i.e. ‘All Ears English’.  As per the free dictionary ‘all ears’ means ‘listening eagerly & carefully’.

Do you mean the same or is there is some other meaning for ‘all ears’ as well.

I have never heard this phrase being used in spoken English (except in your podcast) so just wanted to know how common it is in America.

Is this phrase formal or informal?”

-Mayank

 

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What is the meaning of  “to be all ears”?

The phrase means that you are listening closely.

You’re only listening to the person.

You are wide open to receive information from someone or something specific.

The person has your attention.

 

What does it mean for this show?

You guys should be listening closely to us!

I remember the day we came up with this name.

We were sitting in my kitchen and we had a bunch of ideas but this one just seemed to have a ring to it.

It was fun and clever so we decided to go with it!

 

Is it common?

It’s not common but it’s not outdated.

Here are some situations where you might use it:

  • A parent tries to get a kid to share something that’s going on in his life. The parent could say “Come on. I’m all ears”
  • A boss or manager might say it at a meeting when the employees have expressed that they want to share their opinions on something

 

Other ways to say “I’m all ears”

  • “I’d love to hear from you” This is used more with a phone or text message (voicemail or email)
  • “What’s up?”
  • “I’m here to listen”

 

What questions do you have from today?

Have you ever used this expression?

Let us know in the comments below.

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