AEE 852: Already Versus Yet- What’s the Difference and How to Use Them

What is the difference between the words “already” and “yet”?

They are both important parts of the English language and they have very specific uses.

Do you get confused between these two words easily?

Today we’ll clear up your confusion.

Let’s start with a role play:

M: Hey Lindsay have you made any winter plans yet?

L: No not really. What about you?

M: Well, I was hoping to go visit my friend in Philadelphia, but she already made plans to go on vacation when I’m free! Oh well.

 

Let’s start with a listener question:

Hi guys. Thank you for responding my question. Yeah, the pronunciation of my town was right. In fact, the two words I meant were “yet” and “already”. I got confused, sorry. -Lyneker

 

We have already talked about the word “yet” a little bit. In Episode 384 we talked about how it can be a powerful word.

However, today we’ll talk more about the word “yet” to figure out how to use it in conversations.

 

The meaning of  “yet”:

The dictionary gives many definitions, but we are focusing on this: “Up to now, so far”

 

Some examples:

M: Have you done your holiday shopping yet, Lindsay?

L: Oh no, I should start. I always wait until the last minute.

 

L: Have you planned that episode we talked about for next week?

M: No, not yet. I’ll do it tomorrow

 

This is often used with the present perfect.

Why?

Usually we are talking about something that has not happened up until this moment so it’s connected to the present.

 

The meaning of “already”:

According to the dictionary it means: prior to a specified or implied past, present, or future time, by this time, previously”

  • Example: He had already left when I called.

 

Some examples:

M: When are you coming to NY next?

L: I forgot to tell you! I already booked a train for next weekend!

 

L: How are you doing Michelle?

M: Ugh. It’s only Monday and I’m already exhausted!

 

M: Did you talk to him?

L: I told you, I had already talked to him when you asked me last time!

 

Another way to think of “already” is that something has been done before anticipated.

 

What questions do you have?

Let us know below.

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