AEE 562: The 4 Phrases You Need to Get to Know the Locals

get to know locals in English native

Sometimes you end up in a cool place where you have a unique opportunity to get to know the locals in English.

How do you start off the conversation in an easy way and how do you move it along to get to know them better?

Find out in today’s episode!

A few months ago Lindsay went to Block Island.

Block Island has been called one of the 12 last great places on earth by the Nature Conservancy.

It’s a relaxing place where you can enjoy nature, meet locals, and eat great seafood without the hustle and bustle or snobby attitudes on Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket.

Lindsay visited Block Island before the main summer season so 95% of the island was closed but there was a hidden benefit of coming to the island at that time- there were a lot of opportunities to meet locals!

Today we’ll show you the phrases and questions that Lindsay used to start conversations with the locals and to get to know them better.

 

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How to start the conversation with locals (at a bar, restaurant, coffee shop):

  • “So what’s it like to live here during the winter?” or “What’s it like to live here during the high season?”
  • “What do local people do here on the weekend?” or “What do people do here on the weekend?” or “What do the locals do on the weekend?”
  • “Do people usually (activity)?” example: “Do people usually take the ferry back to the mainland every day?”

 

**These questions are not personal.

They start off in a general way and then if the person responds and seems interested you can get more personal.

 

More personal questions to ask next:

  • “How long have you lived here?”
  • “How do you like it?” (this is better than “do you like it” because it’s more open-ended)

 

Listen to the role play between Lindsay and Michelle to see how these phrases are used!

 

What questions do you have from today?

Let us know in the comments below!

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